Company Press Releases

LEO Pharma A/S makes its first investment in microbiome technology

LEO Pharma A/S makes its first investment in microbiome technology – enters partnership with microbiome-therapeutics company Naked Biome Inc

(Read Leo Pharma’s announcement here.)

Ballerup, Denmark, April 12, 2018 – Today, LEO Pharma A/S, a global leader in medical dermatology and Naked Biome Inc, a San Francisco-based translational microbiome company, announced that LEO Pharma will invest USD 500,000 in Naked Biome.

The investment is LEO Pharma’s first in the microbiome area and underpins the company’s dedication to advance science together with partners and develop life-changing medicines, which improve people’s lives.

At LEO Pharma, we innovate to advance science in dermatology and deliver better treatments to people with skin diseases. The microbiome technology shows exciting potential within dermatology, and with our investment in Naked Biome we can to tap into the company’s expertise with the aim of exploring potential new ways of treating skin disease,” says Kim Kjoeller; EVP of Global R&D at LEO Pharma A/S.

Naked Biome Inc. is a translational microbiome company, which leverages breakthrough science from The Human Microbiome Project, a US National Institute of Health initiative to better characterize the human microbiome and its role underlying human health and disease, to find bacterial applications for skin disease.

The company is based in San Francisco, California and was established in 2015 by Emma Taylor, an MD and UCLA-trained Board-Certified Dermatologist and Dermatopathologist.

We are very excited to collaborate with Leo Pharma, as their expertise in the world of dermatology, particularly as it relates to clinical trial design, formulation, and commercialization will be of great value as we move beyond our proof-of-concept clinical trials,” says Emma Taylor, MD, CEO and founder of Naked Biome.

Naked Biome’s invention is based on the premise that disease-associated strains have clinically relevant genotypes and phenotypes, and that by depleting the disease-associated strains and replacing with health-associated strains, the disease will be mitigated and cured.

The first clinical trial is under way in the field of acne and it is the first topical live biologic therapeutic for treatment of acne. The invention has applicability to other dermatologic diseases. As part of the agreement, LEO Pharma will be part of Naked Biome’s advisory board with focus on advising on clinical trial plans and formulation development.

 

About LEO Pharma

LEO Pharma helps people achieve healthy skin. By offering care solutions to patients in more than 100 countries globally, LEO Pharma supports people in managing their skin conditions. Founded in 1908 and owned by the LEO Foundation, the health care company has devoted decades of research and development to delivering products and solutions to people with skin conditions. LEO Pharma is headquartered in Denmark and employs more than 5,000 people worldwide. Learn more about Leo Pharma at www.leo-pharma.com.

Microbiome Press Releases

UCLA study could explain why some people get zits and others don't

2 strains of acne bacteria linked to pimples, another to healthy skin

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA – LOS ANGELES HEALTH SCIENCES

The bacteria that cause acne live on everyone’s skin, yet one in five people is lucky enough to develop only an occasional pimple over a lifetime. What’s their secret?

In a boon for teenagers everywhere, a UCLA study conducted with researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute has discovered that acne bacteria contain “bad” strains associated with pimples and “good” strains that may protect the skin.

The findings, published in the Feb. 28 edition of the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, could lead to a myriad of new therapies to prevent and treat the disfiguring skin disorder.

“We learned that not all acne bacteria trigger pimples — one strain may help keep skin healthy,” said principal investigator Huiying Li, an assistant professor of molecular and medical pharmacology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. “We hope to apply our findings to develop new strategies that stop blemishes before they start, and enable dermatologists to customize treatment to each patient’s unique cocktail of skin bacteria.”

"Good" strain of bacteria may be key to defeating acne

Having “bad” and “good” acne bacteria could be the reason why some folks are riddled with acne while others have smooth skin.

Researchers have discovered that acne bacteria has different strains that either cause pimples or aids in skin protection.

“We learned that not all acne bacteria trigger pimples — one strain may help keep skin healthy,” principal investigator Huiying Li, an assistant professor of molecular and medical pharmacology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, said in a press release. “We hope to apply our findings to develop new strategies that stop blemishes before they start, and enable dermatologists to customize treatment to each patient’s unique cocktail of skin bacteria.”

New Breakthroughs in Acne to Control “Bad” Bacteria

A UCLA study conducted with researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute has discovered that acne bacteria contain “bad” strains associated with pimples and “good” strains that may protect the skin.

Sarasota,, United States – February 10, 2016 /PressCable/ —

Acne causing bacteria lives on everyone’s skin. One in five people will develop only an occasional pimple over a lifetime.

A UCLA study, conducted with researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, has discovered that acne bacteria contain “bad” strains associated with pimples and “good” strains that may protect the skin.

The recent findings, published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, could lead to new therapies to prevent and treat the disfiguring skin disorder caused by acne.

“It has been learned that not all acne bacteria trigger pimples — one strain may help keep skin healthy,” said principal investigator Huiying Li, an assistant professor of molecular and medical pharmacology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. “The study hopes to apply the findings to develop new strategies that stop blemishes before they start, and enable dermatologists to customize treatment to each patient’s unique cocktail of skin bacteria.”

Vitamin B12 supplement linked to pimply skin

Vitamin B12 tweaks how genes behave in the facial bacteria of some people who normally enjoy clear skin. The activity changes of the facial bacteria promote inflammation and lead to pimples.

By shedding light on one mechanism behind B12’s role in acne, the UCLA finding may identify drug targets that lead to new treatments for acne.

Science Translational Medicine publishes the findings in its June 24 edition.

The research was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

Discovery could mean an end to pimples and severe acne

UCLA researchers have discovered not all acne causing bacteria lead to zits. The finding could mean an end to those embarrassing inflamed spots that plague almost everyone at some point during a lifetime; especially teenagers. The finding is especially important for anyone suffering from severe forms of acne vulgaris.

Protective acne bacteria uncovered

The researchers discovered some bacteria associated with acne actually protects the skin and can prevent blemishes.
Principal investigator Huiying Li, an assistant professor of molecular and medical pharmacology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA said in a press release, “We hope to apply our findings to develop new strategies that stop blemishes before they start, and enable dermatologists to customize treatment to each patient’s unique cocktail of skin bacteria.”

NIH Expands Human Microbiome Project

NIH Expands Human Microbiome Project; Funds Sequencing Centers and Disease Projects

The Human Microbiome Project has awarded more than $42 million to expand its exploration of how the trillions of microscopic organisms that live in or on our bodies affect our health.

The human microbiome is all the microorganisms that reside in or on the human body, as well as all their DNA, or genomes. Launched in 2007 as part of the NIH Common Fund’s Roadmap for Medical Research, the Human Microbiome Project is a $140 million, five-year effort that will produce a resource for researchers who are seeking to use information about the microbiome to improve human health.

“This effort will accelerate our understanding of how our bodies and microorganisms interact to influence health and disease,” said Acting NIH Director Raynard S. Kington, M.D., Ph.D. “Examining the differences between the microbiomes of healthy patients and those of patients suffering from a disease promises to change how we diagnose, treat and, ultimately, prevent many health conditions.”

Huiying Li, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles
Skin: Acne
$990,000
The goal of this study is to examine the association between the skin microbiome and acne.

A revolutionary finding for acne pathophysiology

Journal of Investigative Dermatology

Meet the Investigator: Huiying Li, PhD

Dr. Huiying Li and her laboratory are dedicated to the quest to further elucidate the skin microbiome in human skin diseases. Her early interest in science led to a focus in biochemistry and nutrition at Peking University, China, and UC Berkeley, where she received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees.

She received her Ph.D. degree from UCLA, where she trained in protein X-ray crystallography and bioinformatics under the supervision of Dr. David Eisenberg. She became interested in studying microbes and their interactions with their hosts and environments using a genomic approach.

Could a Vitamin Play a Role in Acne Outbreaks?

WEDNESDAY, June 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) — New research suggests that high levels of vitamin B12 may affect germ activity in certain people, boosting the odds that they’ll develop acne.

However, it’s too early to say if anyone should cut down on their vitamin B12 intake from food or vitamins to avoid getting pimples, researchers said.

“I don’t think we have studied enough to suggest that,” said study leader Huiying Li, assistant professor of molecular & medical pharmacology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Still, the research provides insight into not only vitamin B12 but also genetic activity that could prompt pimples.

“There are certain genes that could potentially influence whether people have acne breakouts or not,” she said. “These genes could be targets of future drug treatment.”

The study appears in the June 24 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Research finds microbes in skin creams can help fight acne

Researchers at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, US have found that adding certain types of microbes to skin cream might be helpful in the treatment of acne. They found that the microbes that cause most common forms of acne come in two types – the type that cause pimples, and a beneficial type that helps keen skin healthy.

“We hope to apply our findings to develop new strategies that stop blemishes before they start,” said lead researcher Huiying Li, adding that the findings would allow dermatologists to personalise acne treatment based on “each patient’s unique cocktail of skin bacteria”.

Study finds good bacteria that may cure acne

There’s new treatment hope for teenagers and adults with acne, as researchers report they’ve found a strain of healthy bacteria that appears to zap nasty zits away.

The study involved clear-skinned volunteers who agreed to have their skin loaded with the “good” strain of bacteria which, ironically, is a cousin of the “bad” bacteria that causes pimples.

As the researchers report in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, it may be possible to treat acne sufferers with the good bacteria, saving them from the agony that acne can cause.

So how could the good bacteria help the bad bacteria that causes acne pimples?

“This P. [Propionibacterium] acnes strain may protect the skin, much like yogurt’s live bacteria help defend the gut from harmful bugs,” said Huiying Li, an assistant professor of molecular and medical pharmacology at the University of California Los Angeles David Geffen School of Medicine.

Can These 3 Foods Help You Say Goodbye to Acne?

YOUR SKIN REFLECTS THE HEALTH OF YOUR INNER ECOSYSTEM

If you’re one of the 80% of Americans that struggle with chronic acne, there’s something you can do about it. Restoring your inner ecosystem can beautify your skin from the inside out and provide long-term acne relief.

A study published this past February in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology revealed that the skin houses both “bad” bacteria and “good” bacteria. The bad strains of bacteria cause mild to severe breakouts. The good strains of bacteria protect the skin. (1)

Huiying Li, leading the study, explains, “We learned that not all acne bacteria trigger pimples—one strain may help keep skin healthy.”

Researchers: Acne linked to vitamin B12

While it is essential for the proper function and development of the brain, nerves, and blood cells, a team of UCLA researchers have discovered that vitamin B12 can alter the behavior of genes in the facial bacteria of some people, promoting inflammation and leading to pimples.

The study, published Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine, highlights how B12 supplements can cause acne to develop.

Dr. Huiying Li, an assistant professor of molecular and medical pharmacology at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine, and Dr. Noah Craft, a dermatologist with the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, led the research as part of the National Institutes of Health’s Human Microbiome Project, an attempt to identify and better understand the role of microorganisms in health.

Other Company IP Related Press Releases

Fitness Magazine Highlights Acne Study

A January online Fitness Magazine story featured a UCLA study demonstrating that resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes, works to inhibit growth of the bacteria that causes acne. The team also found that combining resveratrol with a common acne medication, benzoyl peroxide, may enhance the drug’s ability to kill the bacteria and could translate into new treatments. Dr. Emma Taylor, the study’s first author and an assistant clinical professor of medicine in the division of dermatology, is quoted.

Antioxidant Found in Grapes May Provide News Targets for Acne Treatment

The Business Standard Oct. 9Dermatology Times Oct. 6, The Inquisitor Oct. 5; and  NeonTommy Oct. 1 covered a new study demonstrating that resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes, works to inhibit growth of the bacteria that causes acne. The team also found that combining resveratrol with a common acne medication, benzoyl peroxide, may enhance the drug’s ability to kill the bacteria and could translate into new treatments.  Dr. Emma Taylor, the study’s first author and an assistant clinical professor of medicine in the division of dermatology and senior author Dr. Jenny Kim, professor of clinical medicine in the division of dermatology, were quoted in the coverage.

Antioxidant Found in Grapes May Provide News Targets for Acne Treatment

Deccan ChronicleSun Daily Oct. 3ParadeHuffington Post,  WebMDThe IndependentThe Health SiteMedical DailyIndia TV NewsNewsMax HealthiAfrica, Oct. 2Yahoo NewsHeadlines and Global NewsIndo-Asian News Service,  Westside TodayMedical ResearchBioscience TechnologyNews-Medical, and Red Orbit Oct. 1Fox News,  and Science World Report, Sept. 30 covered a new study demonstrating that resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes, works to inhibit growth of the bacteria that causes acne. The team also found that combining resveratrol with a common acne medication, benzoyl peroxide, may enhance the drug’s ability to kill the bacteria and could translate into new treatments.  Dr. Emma Taylor, the study’s first author and an assistant clinical professor of medicine in the division of dermatology and Dr. Jenny Kim, professor of clinical medicine in the division of dermatology, were quoted in the coverage.

Antioxidant Found in Grapes Uncorks New Targets for Acne Treatment

UCLA study points to resveratrol as key to possible combination therapy

Got grapes? UCLA researchers have demonstrated how resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes and found in wine, works to inhibit growth of the bacteria that causes acne.

The team also found that combining resveratrol with a common acne medication, benzoyl peroxide, may enhance the drug’s ability to kill the bacteria and could translate into new treatments.

Published in the current online edition of the journal Dermatology and Therapy, the early lab findings demonstrated that resveratrol and benzoyl peroxide attack the acne bacteria, called Propionibacterium acnes, in different ways.

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